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Addis Hash House Harriers

The Highest Hash in Africa!

 
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Hash Details!

Welcome to AAHHH, the highest Hash in Africa and one of the highest in the world, at 2400m above sea level. Some call Hash ‘The drinking club with a running problem.’ Perhaps this is true! Come and decide for yourself. We meet every Saturday afternoon, rain or shine, at 2pm / 14h00 (simint sa’at bityopia) in the Hilton Hotel car park, to run (or walk) somewhere nice outside Addis Ababa. Transportation is provided for those without.

We are a Family Hash: we welcome locals and expatriates, young and old, female and male, runners and walkers. We follow a paper trail laid in the morning by 'hares'. The size of the weekly Addis Hash outing ranges from about 60-90 runners and walkers, from a pool of regular Hashers numbering over 400. The run (and a shorter trail for walkers) takes about 60-75 minutes. It is followed by a circle to welcome newcomers and returnees, usually returning to Addis Ababa by 6.30pm (asra-hulet takul). The cost is 30 birr, while newcomers pay a first-time fee of 60 birr. We use this money to subsidise drinks and special events. Further info: +251-911-206908.

Trail Types PDF Email
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 26 August 2009 10:44
There are two types of trails. Live Trails are laid by hares who are given a head start, while Dead Trails are pre-laid hours or days before the Hash begins. Live trails and dead trails are also known as Live Hare and Dead Hare trails, respectively. Live trails are closer to the original "Hare and Hound" tradition, with the intent of the pack being to catch the hare rather than making it to the end, and are more common in the United States, while the rest of the world tends toward dead trails.
A trail may be "A to A," where the trail returns to the start, or "A to B," where the beginning and end of the trail are widely separated. Some trails are referred to as "A to A1 (prime)", denoting an ending point that is close to (usually short walking distance), but not the same as the start.

Last Updated ( Friday, 09 October 2009 12:33 )
 
Trails PDF Email
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 26 August 2009 10:41
Hashing hasn't strayed far from its roots in Kuala Lumpur. The hare(s) mark their trail with paper, chalk, sawdust, or colored flour, depending on the environment and weather.
Special marks may be used to indicate a false trail, a backtrack, a shortcut, or a turn. The most commonly-used mark is a Check, indicating that hashers will have to search in any direction to find the continuation of the trail. Trails may contain a Beer Check, where the pack stops to consume beer, water, or snacks, allowing any stragglers to catch up to the group.
Trails may pass through any sort of terrain and hashers may run through back alleyways, residential areas, city streets, forests, swamps, or shopping malls and may climb fences, ford streams, explore storm drains or scale cliffs in their pursuit of the hare.

Last Updated ( Friday, 09 October 2009 12:33 )